The Money Talk

 
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“The Money Talk” may be one of the most difficult hurdles in a relationship, but is vital to the long-term health and success of any partnership. Money stress is a leading cause of divorce and can be avoided (or at least minimized) through effective communication.

For tips and tricks on how to have The Money Talk, check out chapter 5 of my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

The Market

 
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Every market crash hits at the worst possible time and feels uniquely terrifying. To invest successfully, you’ll need to master your emotions and realize that market crashes are an inevitable part of the market cycle. Trying to time or predict the market can decimate your returns. Stick to buy-and-hold strategies.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

Investment Porn

 
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TV is entertainment. Investing is not. Investment shows prey on fear, greed, and excitement to keep you riveted so they can sell advertising space. That can decimate your wealth. Good investment strategies are boring. Turn off the investment porn and watch some superheroes blow things up instead. You’ll make more money that way.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

The Walking Dead

 
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We have a student loan crisis: Approximately 44 million borrowers collectively owe $1.5 trillion in student loan debt. The average student in the Class of 2017 has almost $40,000 in loans, and the number is much higher for those with graduate degrees. This creates indentured servants who are unable to build full lives, becoming “student loan zombies.”   Significant college debt disrupts major life events, such as buying a house, getting married, having children and saving for retirement. It is hard to compete in a modern economy without a college degree, but it hard to build a prosperous future while carrying huge debt. We need a better way forward.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

How To Survive A Market Crash

 
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Trying to time the market is a fool’s errand. The best way to deal with a market crash is to do nothing. You should be investing for the long term, which requires a buy-and-hold strategy. The best way to torpedo your returns is to forget the “hold” part.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

The Weaponizer

 
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We “weaponize” money when we use it to manipulate those around us – especially when we use money to satisfy our emotional needs. This strategy always backfires, producing resentment in those we love. Money incentives are for employees, not family.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

The Money Debate

 
Money is the root of everything, good and evil. Seeing only half of the truth leaves you blind to the whole truth. We can’t build a school, hospital, church or charity without money. We can’t feed the poor, clothe the naked, or tend to the sick either. If we reject the world of money, we reject the world. Rejecting the world won’t make it a better place for anyone.

Money is the root of everything, good and evil. Seeing only half of the truth leaves you blind to the whole truth. We can’t build a school, hospital, church or charity without money. We can’t feed the poor, clothe the naked, or tend to the sick either.  If we reject the world of money, we reject the world. Rejecting the world won’t make it a better place for anyone.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: A Former Monk’s Financial Guide To Becoming a Little Bit Wealthy —And Why That’s Okay .

 

Godzilla vs Wall Street

 
This cartoon is an inside joke: Historically, small-cap companies have outperformed large-cap companies. So, it makes sense to “tilt” your asset allocation towards small-cap stocks. Small cap companies have more room to grow and can experience rapid growth in a shorter time frame than larger firms.

This cartoon is an inside joke: Historically, small-cap companies have outperformed large-cap companies. So, it makes sense to “tilt” your asset allocation towards small-cap stocks. Small cap companies have more room to grow and can experience rapid growth in a shorter time frame than larger firms.

Click here to pre-order my new book: From Monk to Money Manager: Why It’s Okay to Be a Little Bit Wealthy—And How to Make It Happen.

 

Overconfidence

 
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Too many self-help books on finance devolve into the Cult of Confidence—the belief that you can achieve anything with enough determination. Motivation is essential, but so is common sense. Courage must be balanced by wisdom, otherwise, the results can be disastrous.

To learn the tricks of successful investing, check out my new book, From Monk to Money Manager: Why It’s Okay to Be a Little Bit Wealthy—And How to Make It Happen.